The Science

Here's some of the scientific research underpinning Tūmanako in Psychology, Psychiatry & Facility design.


Addressing the treatment gap: A key challenge for extending evidence-based psychosocial interventions.

Alan E. Kazdin

Department of Psychology, Yale University, 2 Hillhouse Avenue, New Haven, CT 06520-8205, USA

Read here: Addressing the treatment gap


A randomised trial of nutrient supplements to minimise psychological stress after a natural disaster

Bonnie J.Kaplan,  Julia J. Rucklidge, Amy R. Romijn, Michael Dolph, Department of Paediatrics, Alberta Children's Hospital Research Institute, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada

Department of Psychology, University of Canterbury, Christchurch, NewZealand 

Read here: A randomised trial of nutrient supplements to minimise psychological stress after a natural disaster

 

Vitamin–mineral treatment of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder in adults: double-blind randomised placebo-controlled trial

 by Julia J. Rucklidge, Chris M. Frampton, Brigette Gorman and Anna Boggis

The British Journal of Psychiatry, 1–10. doi: 10.1192/bjp.bp.113.132126

Read here: Vitamin–mineral treatment of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder in adults

 

Psychological functioning 1 year after a brief intervention using micronutrients to treat stress and anxiety related to the 2011 Christchurch earthquakes: a naturalistic follow-up

Julia J. Rucklidge*, Neville Blampied, Brigette Gorman, Heather A. Gordon and Ellen Sole

Department of Psychology, University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand

Read here:  Psychological functioning 1 year after a brief intervention using micronutrients to treat stress and anxiety

 

Vitamin-mineral treatment improves aggression and emotional regulation in children with ADHD: a fully blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled trial

Julia J. Rucklidge,1 Matthew J.F. Eggleston,2 Jeanette M. Johnstone,3 Kathryn Darling,1 and Chris M. Frampton4

1Department of Psychology, University of Canterbury, Christchurch; 2Canterbury District Health Board, Christchurch, New Zealand; 3Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR, USA; 4Department of Psychological Medicine, University of Otago, Christchurch, New Zealand

Read here: Vitamin-mineral treatment improves aggression and emotional regulation in children with ADHD

 

Shaken but unstirred? Effects of micronutrients on stress and trauma after an earthquake: RCT evidence comparing formulas and doses

Julia J Rucklidge, Rebecca Andridge, Brigette Gorman, Neville Blampied, Heather Gordon and Anna Boggis

Read here: Effects of micronutrients on stress and trauma after an earthquake


Research INTO Mental health, 'HEALIng' & green care facilities.

 

Mental Health facility design: The case for person-centred care

Jan Alexander Golembiewski

Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry 2015, Vol. 49(3) 203–206 DOI: 10.1177/0004867414565477

Read here: Mental Health Facility Design

 

Sunny hospital rooms expedite recovery from severe and refractory depressions.

Read here: Sunny Hospital Rooms

 

The Design of a Psychiatric Clinic in Sweden Strives to Create a "Healing" Environment.

An interview on behavioural health with Stefan Ludin and Cristiana Caira. You can read here by clicking the link: Healing Environment

 

GREEN CARE in the Nordic countries – a research field in progress.

Report from the Nordic research workshop on Green Care in Trondheim, June 2012. You can read here by clicking the link: Green Care

 

Architectural Healing Environments

Schaller, Brian, "Architectural Healing Environments" (2012). Architecture Senior Theses. Paper 62. http://surface.syr.edu/architecture_theses/62

You can read here by clicking the link: Architectural Healing Environments

 

Wood as a restorative material in healthcare environments.

You can read here by clicking the link: Health Report

 

Healthcare DENMARK

New Danish psychiatric hospital wins prestigious award. New Danish Psychiatric Hospital

 

The Architecture of Hope - THE MAGGIE CENTRES

Book available here

The Architecture of Hope argues that hope, necessarily bound up with fear, is a state of mind that needs constant support. Like the medical and architectural professions themselves, hope is directed towards a better future. This future orientation explains why good design and cancer support – the subjects of the book – are so closely connected. The metaphors of hope embodied in the designs are based on nature and the cosmos, and are carried through, in different ways, by the intimate spaces of each Centre. They present an environment that is warm and welcoming and with a commitment to the other arts, including landscape, they bring in the full panoply of constructive means.

Started in 1996 in Scotland, the first Maggie’s Centres were designed by well-known architects such as Richard MurphyPage\ParkFrank Gehry and Zaha Hahid. Then, expanding to England and Wales in 2008, the next few Centres were conceived by Richard Rogers, the late Richard MacCormacRem KoolhaasPiers Gough and the late Kisho Kurokawa. All these architects were friends of Charles Jencks and his late wife Maggie, whose vision was the initial inspiration. The close friendship helps explain the personal commitment that has been maintained as the Centres have continued to grow.

Maggie’s has recently opened Centres, designed by Ted CullinanSnøhettaCarmody Groarke and Wilkinson Eyre, while on the drawing boards are designs by A_LADow JonesNordThomas Heatherwick and Norman Foster. Well-known, or young and talented, these architects set the bar high for each other, just as the landscape and garden designers are starting to do.